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Bachelor of Arts in American Urban Studies

Course Offerings

The first two semesters focus on helping students master basic college skills, as well as critical thinking, effective writing, and using technology. Commencing in the third semester, and throughout the remaining semesters, students are required to engage in an internship experience of seven hours weekly.

Bachelor of Arts in American Urban Studies - 128 credits



Credits Bachelor of Arts in American Urban Studies Course Offerings

Semester 1 Semester 2 Semester 3 Semester 4 Semester 5 Semester 6 Semester 7 Semester 8
Purpose Seminar Self-Assessment through Writing & Technology
(3 credits)
Becoming an Independent Learner
(3 credits)
Communicating with Others: Interpersonal Relations & Conflict Resolution
(3 credits)
Living and Learning in Groups
(3 credits)
Communicating across Cultures
(3 credits)
Promoting Empowerment through the Arts
(3 credits)
Empowering Urban Communities through Civic Engagement I
(4 credits)
Empowering Urban Communities through Civic Engagement II
(4 credits)
Liberal Arts & Sciences Courses through Dimensions Contemporary Values & Classical Ethics
(V)
(3 credits)
Understanding Self in the World
(V, SO, SYS)
(3 credits)
The Human Experience & Cooperation
(V, SO SYS)
(3 credits)
World History & Geography
(V, SO, SYS)
(3 credits)
Everyday Life in Urban Settings
(V, SO, SYS)
(3 credits)
Urban Health & Ecology
(V, SO, SYS, SKI)
(3 credits)
American Urban Politics
(V, SO, SYS)
(4 credits)
American Urban Culture
(V, SO, SYS)
(4 credits)
Latin for Writers I
(V, SO, SYS, SKI)
(3 credits)
Latin for Writers II
(V, SO, SYS, SKI)
(3 credits)
Human Biology & the Life Sciences
(V, SO, SYS)
(3 credits)
Linguistics for Non-linguists
(SKI)
(2 credits)
Language & Culture
(V, SO, SKI)
(3 credits)
American Government
(SYS)
(3 credits)
American Economic History I
(V, SYS)
(4 credits)
American Economic History II
(V, SYS)
(4 credits)
Values (V)

Self & Others (SO)

Systems (SYS)

Skills(SKI)
Computer Applications for Profit & Non-Profit Management
(SKI)
(3 credits)
Critical Thinking & Writing
(SKI)
(3 credits)
Writing through Literature & Philosophy
(V, SKI)
(3 credits)
Public Speaking & the Art of Persuasion
(SO, SYS, SKI)
(3 credits)
Political & Economic Philosophy
(V)
(3 credits)
Understanding Poetry, Drama & Film
(V, SO, SKI)
(3 credits)
Music, Religion & Philosophy
(V, SO, SYS)
(3 credits)
MCNY Great Books Seminar
(V, SO, SYS, SKI)
(3 credits)
Math I: Mathematical Reasoning
(SKI)
(3 credits)
Math II: Introduction to Statistical Reasoning
(SKI)
(3 credits)
Math III: Quantitative Methods & Medical Statistics
(SKI, SYS)
(3 credits)
Earth Science
(V, SO, SYS, SKI)
(4 credits)
Economic Principles & Financial Literacy
(V, SO, SKI)

(3 credits)
Creative Writing: Imaginative Uses of Language
(V, SO, SKI)
(3 credits)
   
Credits 15 credits 15 credits 15 credits 15 credits 15 credits 15 credits 15 credits 15 credits

Semester 1

Constructive Action Practicum: Self –Assessment through Writing and Technology (PCA 111) (3 credits)
In this course, students learn to use writing and technology for assessing their own strengths and weaknesses as students and citizens of the world. The first part of the course is devoted to developing critical thinking and writing skills and assessing one’s own preparedness for academia. Students develop strategies for note taking, reading comprehension, avoiding plagiarism, and other skills for successful college performance and civic engagement. The second part of the course is dedicated to identifying and implementing a plan of action. The plan of action asks students to identify an issue in one’s own neighborhood and through writing, research, and analysis, to devise a plan to address that issue. Students learn and model how to develop skills in writing, critical thinking, and self assessment in order to become more effective thinkers and leaders.
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Contemporary Values and Classical Ethics (ETH CC 120) (3 credits)
Introduction to values including definition, sources, relation to social rules, clarification, conflicts and their resolution; empowerment and its roots in history; illustrations from literature and the other humanities.
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Latin for Writers I (LAT 111) (3 credits)
Through careful reading, translation, and analysis of Latin sentences, students acquire the knowledge and ability to analyze and describe a sentence as a structure of logical relationships and to effectively gauge their own use of the written word. Other areas include: the influence of Latin on the development of English vocabulary and its use today (in law, science, and education), Roman history and the influence of Roman culture on the development of Western literacy and civilization.
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Computer Applications for Profit and Non-Profit Management (MIS CC 130) (3 credits)
An introduction to Microsoft Office Suite, including Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Access. Students are encouraged at the end of the course to seek Microsoft Office User Specialist (MOUS) certification. Students also become familiar with the use of the Internet for research.
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Math I: Mathematical Reasoning (MTH 111) (3 credits)
Topics are drawn from a wide range of applied mathematics, with particular emphasis on applications that bridge multiple disciplines and everyday life. The course enriches the usefulness of mathematics, and provides opportunities for students to increase their confidence and facility in using quantitative reasoning.
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Semester 2

Constructive Practicum: Becoming an Independent Learner (PCA 121/FLD 121) (3 credits)
Becoming an independent learner requires the abilities associated with planning one’s own learning path. Tools, such as authentic assessments, can offer students opportunities to evaluate what topics they learn and how they learn these topics. By incorporating personal- and social-learning opportunities with experiential learning activities, students will gain the competencies necessary to become self-directed learners. This course will provide students insights into their own metacognitive processes by allowing learners to explore the ways each of us obtain, process, and remember knowledge and skills we will call upon in the future. Students will be able to take charge of their own learning.
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Understanding Self in the World (HUM 121) (3 credits)
This self-assessment course requires students to question their identity from perspectives of world religion, literature, art, philosophy, and psychology. Course lectures are supplemented by field trips to museums and art galleries.
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Latin for Writers II (LAT 121) (3 credits)
Through careful reading, translation, and analysis of Latin sentences, students learn to analyze and describe a sentence as a structure of logical relationships and to effectively monitor their use of the written word. They further study the influence of Latin on the development of English vocabulary, Roman history and the influence of Roman culture on the development of Western literacy and civilization.
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Critical Thinking and Writing Through the Study of Literature (ENG CC 110) (3 credits)
This course uses the framework of Purpose-Centered Education to help you develop critical thinking and writing skills. You will develop these skills by learning to critically analyze sentences, to construct effective paragraphs, to use narrative (story telling) and argumentation as styles of writing and by learning to apply the MCNY Dimensional Analysis to works of literature
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Math II: Introductory to Statistical Reasoning (MTH 121) (3 credits)
Today's global and technologically oriented economy requires well-developed quantitative skills. This course fosters proficiency in the content, methods, and strategies of higher-level quantitative analysis. Students are introduced to the practical methodology and underlying concepts of data analysis. Topics covered include exploratory vs. confirmatory statistics; summary measures and distributions of single variables; bi-variable statistical analysis and relationships between variables; discovering patterns and structure in data; and re-expression of data.
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Semester 3

Constructive Action Practicum: Communicating with Others: Interpersonal Relations and Conflict Resolution (PCA 231, FLD 231) (3 credits)
In this Constructive Action Practicum, students understand the cycle of conflict, learn to turn conflict into cooperation, develop an awareness of personal attitudes in conflict situations, and master the critical elements of effective interpersonal communication such as active listening, detecting hidden agendas, and practicing win-win negotiations.
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The Human Experience and Cooperation (SSC 231) (3 credits)
This is a course in the history of cooperation in human development. In approaching this topic, we take an interdisciplinary approach, drawing on the fields of social psychology, anthropology, and literature. We examine both cooperation and competition in the course, but our emphasis will be on the study of cooperation, its advantages and disadvantages, how to promote it, and what happens to a human society when cooperation fails. We pay particular attention to how cooperation relates to evolution and how the model of the cooperative organization is today being championed in the world of business.
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Human Biology and the Life Sciences (BIO CC 180) (3 credits)
This course presents human biology as a life science and covers health issues. Students learn how systems fail and what kinds of medical interventions can be successful. Current issues in the life sciences, including common human diseases, genetic engineering, stem cell research and the impact of humans on the planet's ecosystems are explored.
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Writing through Literature and Philosophy (ENG 231) (3 credits)
While reading through a wide variety of literary and philosophical sources, students reflect upon their own educational experiences and develop their own theories about teaching and learning. Students submit different forms of exposition (narrative, description, analysis, comparison, and argument) in three-stages: pre-writing, drafting, and revision in a bi-weekly “writing workshop” class.
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Math III: Quantitative Methods & Medical Statistics (MTH 231) (3 credits)
This course examines statistics within its social and historical contexts; how statistical analysis makes social inquiry more objective and scientific. Students learn the historical development and the philosophy of statistics, the use (and reuse) of official statistics by the state, common ways statistics are used in research, and the use of statistics for social critique. Students learn to identify subjective ideology embedded in purportedly scientific arguments, while exploring the use of statistics in understanding social conditions, theory, and practice.
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Semester 4

Constructive Action Practicum: Living and Learning in Groups (PCA 241 / FLD 241) (3 credits)
Learning to be a productive and useful group member is a vital skill, which must be learned in order to achieve success in the modern workplace. Be it a business or a social agency, today’s workplace counts on teams and work groups to get the business of the organization done. Even one unproductive member can slow down or divert the work of the organization. The course begins by first studying the theories that underlie the group process. Students then move from theory to practice by participating in various group activities
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World History and Geography (HIS 241) (3 credits)
One of the most debated questions in history is why some groups, such as modern Europeans, have in general attained more power and higher standard of living than other groups such as Africans, Native Americans, Asians, etc. In this course, students receive an overview of specific event in world history such as major events how they happened and why they happened. From the migrations of hunter-gatherers out of Africa to emergence of food production around river valleys to eventual world domination by Europe and North America, learners examine the role of climate, geography and biology, including the effect on various groups of global warming and cooling, the horizontal or vertical layout of continents, genetic diversity and resistance to disease. Consideration of the East/West civilization conflict, students conclude the course by asking what has been the role of environment - desert, mountains, flood plains, access to ocean travel, etc. – in forming the cultural values and attitudes that now seem violently incompatible. In addition, the course provides opportunities to understand the “global experience” by a number of field studies using what New York City has to offer.
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Linguistics for Writers (LIN 241) (2 credits)
This course covers written English from a linguistic perspective. Students learn the structure and use of English sentences on the written page: the tense structure of American English, and the small cohesive devices of writers. Students learn about the social appropriateness of different kinds of writing. The course includes lectures, discussions of readings, analysis activities, presentations and language exercises.
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Public Speaking and the Art of Persuasion (SPE CC 160) (3 credits)
Public speaking is an essential skill of leadership. Students are introduced to the tradition of public speaking and persuasion techniques. Through readings and other activities, students improve public speaking and critical thinking skills. This course emphasizes analysis, reasoning, organization, and presentation of evidence.
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Earth Science (ESC 241) (4 credits)
This course focuses on the study of the natural phenomena that structure the environment of the Earth such as the atmosphere and global temperatures, oceans and oceanic circulation, plate tectonics, cycles of rock change, designation of spheres (lithosphere, atmosphere, etc.) and other important geographical topics. Throughout the sequence, we will consider the interaction of physical geography and environmental change, the effect of climate on culture, and the relations between natural ecosystems and human population growth and distribution.In the laboratory portion of the course, we will practice our skills both online and experiential learning environments. Field trips to museums and geographic excursions will also be part of the laboratory experience.
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Semester 5

Constructive Action Practicum: Communicating across Cultures (PCA 351, FLD 351) (3 credits)
Students complete an ethnography of communication project in which they demonstrate their ability to interact with a diverse society. Students study an ethnic community different from their own, in direct contact with the citizens of the community. In the first part of the course, students acquire a theoretical background in the ethnography of communication and learn specific skills for planning, conducting and assessing an ethnographic interview. In the second part of the course they carry out the plan and assess the results.
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Everyday Life in Urban Settings (URB 351) (3 credits)
This course examines the complex interaction of neighborhoods and individuals. It focuses on three institutions: family, school, and the subcultures of various groups - especially the "society" of youth. This sequence extends the study of urban history and politics on both macro- and microeconomic levels, including aspects of the Criminal Justice system. Students consider differences between scholarly knowledge and the influence of family and peers.
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Language and Culture (ANT 351) (3 credits)
Students study the interconnection of language and culture in the multicultural and global age. This course focuses on the nexus of language, communication, and culture. Students develop knowledge, skills, and sensitivity necessary for effective cross-cultural communication. The course covers such topics as culture and conflict, verbal processes for speaking across cultures, gender-based language differences, and peace as an ethic for cross-cultural communication.
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Political & Economic Philosophy (PSC CC 140) (3 credits)
The ideas and values that serve as the foundation of our political system; how our system differs from others; the inter-relationship between business and government; major political theories regarding the nature of authority, standards of justice, the ideal of liberty and its limitations, conceptions of a just and good society, and the best form of government
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Economic Principles and Financial Literacy (ECO 351) (3 credits)
This course introduces students to economic reasoning and the basic economic concepts and theories used in micro- and macroeconomics. Students apply these theories in analysis of contemporary economic issues such as growth and economic cycles, prices, inflation, and unemployment. Economic techniques, including graphing and marginal analysis, are introduced and applied to practical issues of everyday life. In addition, students learn skills necessary for financial stability and literacy.
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Semester 6

Empowerment through the Arts (ART CC 170) (3 credits)
Art is a form of human communication that often transcends the literal. Art has been used to empower individuals and groups to share their voices, creative visions, and beliefs to a larger social order. Urban environments in particular have been the breeding ground to many influential art forms and artists. For this course, art will be broadly defined as activities that engage the imagination, creative spirit, and intellectual curiosity in the service of aesthetic production. Some specific examples of art that have been used to empower urban subjects include creative writing, such as novels, short stories, and poetry; visual art, such as painting, murals, photography, and sculpture; all aspects of music production, including composing, playing an instrument, and singing; and all forms of kinesthetic art such as dancing, acting, and performance art.
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Urban Health and Ecology (URB 361) (3 credits)
This course presents an ecological interdisciplinary approach to the study of urban health. Students will examine the impact of the urban environment on population health, focusing on several health conditions influenced by the ecology of urban environments. Additionally, students will examine current efforts to improve the quality of life and health for citizens living and working in urban settings.
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American Government (GOV CC 150) (3 credits)
An analysis of current political systems with emphasis on the United States, including decision making under different ideologies, and how individual interests become positive or negative forces for group decisions, at local, national, and international levels. This course explores the structure and dynamics of American national government, providing a broad-based introduction to the ideas and institutions that shape politics in the contemporary United States.
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Understanding Poetry, Drama, & Film (LIT 361) (3 credits)
Few writers have influenced the world of ideas more than William Shakespeare. This course studies the poetry of Shakespeare's plays. Students learn to read and appreciate Shakespeare's language and look for popular expressions which originated with the playwright. Students view some of the modern adaptations of Shakespeare's plays on film such as Romeo and Juliet and Othello, and compare these modern film versions with the original plays.
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Creative Writing (ENG 361) (3 credits)
Students explore the possibilities of language by completing a one-act play. In the first part of this course, the student chooses what to write and is allowed free expression of creativity without restriction. Students are encouraged to work through creative blocks to find deeper, more honest elements of their creativity. As the course proceeds, students learn the difference between free expression and artistic creation and apply formal structure to their play. Through reading published plays, students explore various playwriting techniques
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Semester 7

Constructive Action Practicum: Empowering Urban Communities through Civic Engagement I (PCA 471, FLD 471) (4 credits)
The Constructive Action Practicum for semesters 7 and 8 is a two-semester capstone seminar (8 credits) in the planning/assessment and planning/implementation of a Constructive Action. Students address urban problems using basic research methodology. They distinguish between quantitative and qualitative approaches ranging from research design, data collection and sampling, and statistical result interpretation. Students review literature, write results, and understand data. Students understand different measurement models, their selection, and use them in their own research. They study theory and application of basic statistical concepts and how they affect designs of research, integrated with application of computer statistical programs. They also learn the language used in the field of urban research. Students develop a research hypothesis at their internship or job, develop a questionnaire or other survey instrument, create a plan of action based on survey results, implement the plan, and assess the results.
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American Urban Politics (PSC 471) (4 credits)
This one-semester course delineates elements of urban politics such as international affairs and national and state politics. Students learn the relationships between various levels of government and political power. Participation as both citizen and professional in community life is considered in regard to the dynamics of city politics. New York City politics are compared with the politics of other cities (which, in various ways, have adopted different models of governance) such as Chicago, Los Angeles and San Francisco.
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American Economic History I (ECO 471) (4 credits)
This course examines the history of the development of the United States into a modern industrial capitalist society. Political and cultural dimensions are explored, with a focus on global and domestic influences that shaped the economic system. Topics include class, race and gender, international trade, immigration and slave trade, technological change, and war.
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Music, Religion and Philosophy (HUM 471) (4 credits)
This course places music in the context of social systems which produce it, concentrating on the use of music in the life of cities. After an introductory session on ancient music and music theory (Pythagoras and Plato), students examine the elements of music: rhythm, melody and harmony. The focus of this course is on public use of music in the modern period: Beethoven's "revolutionary" symphonies; concert halls and opera houses; the role of music in nationalism and cultural definition; Wagner's "total work of art" and his musical utopia, the Bayreuth Festival; blues and jazz as alternatives to the European mainstream; and rock, disco and hip hop. Each class session begins with a musical selection, which is discussed from historical and musicological perspectives, including an examination of the score.
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Semester 8

Constructive Action Practicum: II: Empowering Urban Communities through Civic Engagement II (PCA 481, FLD 481) (4 credits)
The Constructive Action Practicum for semesters 7 and 8 is a two-semester capstone seminar (8 credits) in the planning/assessment and planning/implementation of a Constructive Action. Students address urban problems using basic research methodology. Students will demonstrate all 9 Dimension Specific Abilities in the two-semester capstone Constructive Action.
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American Urban Culture (SSC 481) (4 credits)
The fourth core of the Urban Studies major is a one semester course which addresses urban culture in two dimensions: forms of artistic representation, especially literature, music, visual arts, such as film, television, painting, sculpture and architecture; and forms of intellectual and ideological representation. The latter includes an examination of cultural concepts such as modernism and postmodernism, and race, gender and ethnicity in aesthetic forms, and cultural studies. This course includes class and individual visits to museums, plays and films, walking architectural tours; and class demonstrations in records, visual representations of artistic works, and guest lectures by practitioners in the arts and cultural criticism.
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American Economic History II (ECO 481) (4 credits)
This course examines corporate power and the concentrated political influence of interest groups. Topics covered include monopoly, and effects such as price fixing. Significant labor reform movements of the first two decades of the 20 century are studied, including radical responses to the domination of capital, mass striking, and the rise of social political parties. Students explore other social and economic events in regard to the African-American experience from this period, and the writings of African-American intellectuals Booker T. Washington and WEB Du Bois.
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MCNY Great Books Seminar (URB 482) (4 credits)
The MCNY Great Books Seminar is the culmination of the liberal arts program at Metropolitan College of New York. In this course, students study classic texts of the world’s great civilizations, ranging from Homer and the Bible to Confucius and the Koran, from Plato and Augustine to the Upanishads and Emerson. They read and study texts that have made a difference in what we humans believe and how we act in the world. Topics may focus on one author or tradition or on a number of authors and several traditions or on a period of history, e.g., the Renaissance, the Enlightenment, etc.
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Mailing Address MCNY (431 Canal Street New York, NY 10013 · 529 Courtlandt Avenue Bronx, New York 10451)
Phone Number  (800) 33 THINK | 212 343 1234