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The MPA in Emergency and Disaster Management
Disaster Central
MCNY's Emergency and Disaster Management Blog

Why More Men Die in Floods

June 25, 2008

In its June 24, 2008, edition, TIME Magazine published an interesting article by Senior Writer Amanda Ripley titled, “Why More Men Die in Floods.”  Disaster Central encourages its readers to read this article as it contains a number of valuable points concerning the relationship between gender and survivability.  The article can be accessed at:  http://www.time.com/time/nation/article/0,8599,1817603,00.html

For some time, we’ve recognized a connection between social/economic class and survivability - now there appears to be further evidence to support a connection between gender and survivability.  Are men less prepared than women?  Or are these statistics due to the fact that many first responders are male, and therefore more likely to die while carrying out their duties?  It has been suggested that many emergency management preparedness programs be directed at females as they most often play an integral role in protecting children during emergency situations – does this lead to an unintended gender imbalance in the preparedness and response matrices?

Disaster Central invites your comments.

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Disaster Central is also a resource for information relating to MCNY’s MPA program in Emergency Management and Homeland Security, as well as providing insight and commentary on the topics of Disaster Management, Emergency Management and Homeland Security.

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