How to Boost Self-Confidence in Mathematics

by on October 16, 2012 in Reflections with No Comments »


Introduction

Many recent high school graduates are experiencing certain difficulties in dealing with college undergraduate mathematics. A lot of researchers on students in college performance reveal that many first-year students are coming underprepared for college life and are frequently frustrated by sequential failure in remedial math sequence and drop out of college. “For some, it may be that their confidence has been severely dented by someone who taught them maths [sic] in a forceful or unsympathetic manner, so that they came to believe that they were ‘no good at maths [sic]’” (Fewings, 2011).

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Fraction Myth Debunked

by on June 29, 2012 in Reflections with No Comments »


Introduction

The hottest discussion topic among mathematic educators within Metropolitan College of New York revolves around the idea of what mathematic skills our students should have. The biggest concern arises when students face failure with fraction concepts. The advancement from secondary to post-secondary education demands that students should have already mastered these skills in elementary school and demonstrated computational proficiency during the Accuplacer entry examination. However, newly admitted and even some continuing students continue to struggle with concepts of fraction addition and fraction subtraction. So, many students believe that mastery of fraction skills will never be achieved. This belief is a myth.
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What is the Deep Nature of Reality?

by on May 26, 2012 in Fresh From the Field with No Comments »


Since the beginning of time humanity has been looking at the surrounding world as a book of nature and continually trying to study it through different views and approaches, which later in time, developed into sciences like mathematics, physics and chemistry etc. Over time, many scientific discoveries were made and many theories aiming to explain these scientific advances emerged.

Why should we care?

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Solving Brain Teasers

by on March 8, 2012 in Must Sees with No Comments »


Introduction

Society expects teachers to successfully facilitate students’ cognitive development. But cognition occurs when taught material makes sense and is affected by emotional development. Recognizing that neither teachers nor students are educated in pieces, but rather as part of a larger educational system, we must address many variables that affect students’ attitudes, morale, and school performance. One of these variables is the ongoing training in problem solutions in a classroom setting. Lately, I have been thinking about how a student’s intellectual growth and confidence are improved via finding solutions to brain teasers.

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