How Public Education is Changing (Animated Version)

by on October 9, 2014 in Must Sees with No Comments »


This video depicts a speech given by English educationalist Sir Ken Robinson about the changing paradigm of public education all over the world in full animation. Cool graphics, intriguing ideas.

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The Problem with the Ivy Leagues

by on September 30, 2014 in Must Reads with No Comments »


studentsThe most-read article in the history of the magazine The New Republic is “Don’t Send Your Kid to the Ivy League.” Published in July as an excerpt from author William Deresiewicz’s book Excellent Sheep, it started a national conversation about higher education, and one of the most interesting responses, published in the same magazine, is titled “The Trouble With Harvard.” Both offer provocative thoughts on education, classes, standardized testing, and the point of college.

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Student Recognition Ceremony, Summer 2014

by on August 2, 2014 in Events with No Comments »


On the final day of July, just two weeks before the Summer 2014 semester concluded, the LEC hosted its second Student Recognition Ceremony, honoring MCNY students who had spent three or more sessions in the LEC. The ceremony, which was held in the 12th floor Art Gallery at the Manhattan campus, featured introductory remarks from LEC and Mentoring Coordinator Dwight Hodgson and Director of Academic Support Parker Pracjek, as well as comments from LEC Specialists. This time, Dan Katz, Vice President for Academic Affairs, addressed to the students, and the event had its first keynote speak, Emergency Disaster and Management alumnus Elie Jerome (who provided us with the photos, except for the one he’s in). Below are pictures from the event.

Student Recognition 3 - SU 14

Parker Pracjek, Director of Academic Support (left), and Yasmine Alwan, Writing Specialist (right), laugh with keynote speaker Elie Jerome (center)

CONTINUE READING →

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Imagining Mark Twain Writing About Common Core Testing

by on July 21, 2014 in Must Reads with No Comments »


twainIn this article — which may be of specific interest to students in MCNY’s M.S. Ed. program — David Perrin, a high school English teacher in Illinois, imagines what Mark Twain, one of our country’s most important satirists, would have thought about the U.S.’s trend of standardized testing. Referencing a range of people from Louie C.K. to Glenn Beck to Helen Keller, the article also links to two of Twain’s original texts: a parody of a Brooklyn teacher’s misinformed students and an essay skewering public schools for rote teaching methods.

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The New Reading Rainbow

by on July 9, 2014 in Must Sees with No Comments »


Anyone remember “Reading Rainbow,” the show geared toward getting kids to read? It ran on PBS from 1983-2006, and in 2012 it became a downloadable app. Now it has a funny new Kickstarter campaign, starring its longtime beloved host, LeVar Burton, raising money to improve the app. Check it out below.

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LEC Student Profile: Krystal Melendez

by on June 23, 2014 in Paths To MCNY with No Comments »


Krystal MelendezI was raised in Coney Island, Brooklyn, along with my three sisters and brother. I witnessed issues such as addiction, domestic violence, and gun violence damage many of the families around me. During those years, I was also lumped into stereotypical assumptions of character based on my ethnicity and what neighborhood I called home. The discrimination that I experienced and my environment are reasons I am enrolled in MCNY’s Human Services degree program today. My first attempt at college was in 2004. The transition from Leon M. Goldstein high school to John Jay College was not easy. I was 17 years old, fresh out of high-school, and full of anxiety. Reasons for dropping out of John Jay were: 1. Confusion, 2. Enrollment in courses I was not interested in and 3. The inability to juggle the demands of work, school, family and my social life. Subsequently, I spent my time quitting every job that hired me because there were no opportunities for growth. I also completed training programs along the way, which I felt would broaden my horizons. Although I did well, I exited each program with an overall sense of unpreparedness and lack of sufficient work experience. I decided to return to college because a degree is necessary for me to achieve the level of success I desire. My first college experience was a culture shock. I felt like I was doggy paddling my way through my classes, barely able to keep my head above the water. The second time around, factors that have contributed to my success at MCNY are: accepting feedback, having clear goals, utilizing available resources, and learning how to manage my time. In addition, the faculty continuously challenges me to raise the bar of my own expectations. I have learned not to be ashamed to ask for help, to take charge of my learning; revisiting the basics often is necessary, and achieving a balance is difficult but possible.

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The Benefits of Handwriting

by on June 6, 2014 in Must Reads with No Comments »


handwritingDid you ever wonder what will happen if (/when) no one writes by hand anymore? As explained in this article, psychologists and neuroscientists have found new evidence that suggests deep links between handwriting and broader educational development.

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What Have We Learned From 50 Years of Research on Writing?

by on May 29, 2014 in Must Sees with No Comments »


This video, from the University of California, brings together three leaders in the field of writing research and instruction, to talk about teaching and reading and writing at all levels of education.

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Public Education Reform in Newark, New Jersey

by on May 21, 2014 in Must Reads with No Comments »


newarkIn 2010, at the urging of then-Newark Mayor Cory Booker, and with the support of New Jersey Governor Chris Christie, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg pledged $100 million to reform schools in Newark, where public education is as bad as anywhere in the country. Last week, The New Yorker published a long and fascinating article examining how that money has been spent, and whether or not the problem has been solved. (Hint: Not quite.)

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LEC Student Profile: Moe Zin Win

by on May 16, 2014 in Paths To MCNY with No Comments »


100_1416[1]Last year, Moe Zin Win was a high school student at the National School of Myanmar. One day, MCNY representatives visited his school and gave a seminar about the business program. He knew he would get a good education in the U.S., so he decided to leave his family and come to New York — despite not knowing a single person here. People had told him that New York City was the  major city of America, and he was very excited, figuring there would be lots to do and he would never be bored. He was right about that, but he also thought the city would be clean and was surprised to find the transportation system as dirty as Myanmar’s! Although he misses aspects of his home — the warm weather; the Burmese food; living in a big house instead (now he shares a small apartment, in Elmhurst, Queens, with a friend from Myanmar who attends NYU) — he likes living in New York and studying at MCNY.

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