Learning Strategies Every Student Should Know

by on January 16, 2014 in Student Lingo with No Comments »


fish

These fish have learned well.

Here at The Specialist, we have quick links to every Student Lingo webinar offered through the LEC. Webinars (website + seminar) are innovative and interactive tools to enhance, or help you brush up on, your skills in various areas and subjects. They last 20-30 minutes and are taught by living, breathing professionals who patiently guide you through the topic. The best part? You can take them on any device, at any time.

In this webinar, Learning Strategies Every Student Should Know, you will learn:

  • The difference between studying and learning
  • The basics of metacognition
  • How to use metacognition when studying
  • The study cycle learning strategy
  • How this study cycle can help you move to higher learning levels

To take Learning Strategies Every Student Should Know, click here. You will be asked to fill out a short form, and the webinar will pop up in another window.

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Specialist Hours for Spring 2014

by on January 15, 2014 in LEC Info with No Comments »


time-clock
How to schedule a session

We find that most students choose to schedule sessions in person, either with their specialist or with our office manager, Sandra Ariza. But you can call and/or email your specialist at any time (see below for current specialist hours in Manhattan and the Bronx) or call and/or email Sandra, ext. 2438, sariza@mcny.edu.

Specialist Hours, Manhattan Campus, Room 1293

Nathan (ext. 2418, nschiller@mcny.edu): Tue, 2-5; Wed, 9-6; Thur, 9-6

Polly (ext. 2429, pbresnick@mcny.edu): Tue 9-6:30; Wed, 4-8; Thur, 9-6:30; Fri, 9-6:30; Sat 10-2

Yasmine (ext. 2416, yalwan@mcny.edu): Mon, 9:30-11:15, 1:30-6:30; Tue, 9:30-6:30; Wed, 9-10:15, 12:30-6:30

Barrington (ext. 2449, bscott@mcny.edu): Mon, 1-7; Tue, 4-7; Wed, 1-7; Thur, 12:30-7

Aleksandr (ext. 2446, arusinov@mcny.edu): Mon, 2-3 (group only); Tue, 2-6; Fri, 2-6; Sat, 2-5

Specialist Hours, Bronx Extension Center, Room 508

Nathan (ext. 4011, nschiller@mcny.edu): Mon, 9-5; Tue, 9-1; Sat, 9-12

Aleksandr (ext. 4006, arusinov@mcny.edu): Wed, 3-7; Sat, 10-1

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Understanding And Avoiding Plagiarism

by on January 13, 2014 in Student Lingo with No Comments »


plagiarism

Don’t try this at home (or in school).

Here at The Specialist, we have quick links to every Student Lingo webinar offered through the LEC. Webinars (website + seminar) are innovative and interactive tools to enhance, or help you brush up on, your skills in various areas and subjects. They last 20-30 minutes and are taught by living, breathing professionals who patiently guide you through the topic. The best part? You can take them on any device, at any time.

In this webinar, Understanding And Avoiding Plagiarism, you will learn the:

  • Definition of plagiarism and what types of information must be cited
  • Common student behaviors that lead to plagiarism
  • Time management behaviors and organizational behaviors that can help students avoid plagiarizing
  • Ways to quote, paraphrase and summarize without plagiarizing
  • Citation requirements for common documentation styles

To take Understanding And Avoiding Plagiarism, click here. You will be asked to fill out a short form, and the webinar will pop up in another window.

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Study Tips And Note-Taking Strategies

by on January 9, 2014 in Student Lingo with No Comments »


note-taking

Note-taking resources have improved slightly in 2014.

Here at The Specialist, we have quick links to every Student Lingo webinar offered through the LEC. Webinars (website + seminar) are innovative and interactive tools to enhance, or help you brush up on, your skills in various areas and subjects. They are taught by living, breathing professionals who patiently guide you through the topic. The best part? You can take them on any device, at any time.

In this webinar, Study Tips And Note-Taking Strategies, you will learn to:

  • Consider the ways in which your learning style influences how you study
  • Take effective notes in college
  • Reconcile class notes with out-of-class notes on your readings
  • Self-evaluate level of preparedness for exams
  • Apply higher order thinking strategies to study methods
  • Improve performance on multiple choice exams

To take Study Tips And Note-Taking Strategies, click here. You will be asked to fill out a short form, and the webinar will pop up in another window.

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Discover Your Learning Style

by on January 6, 2014 in Student Lingo with No Comments »


simpsons

Look at how intensely focused these learners are on letting their teacher help them discover their learning style!

Here at The Specialist, we have quick links to every Student Lingo webinar offered through the LEC. Webinars (website + seminar) are innovative and interactive tools to enhance, or help you brush up on, your skills in various areas and subjects. They last 20-30 minutes and are taught by living, breathing professionals who patiently guide you through the topic. The best part? You can take them on any device, at any time.

In this webinar, Discover Your Learning Style, you will learn:

  • Why it’s important to know how you learn
  • What a learning style is
  • How you personally learn best
  • Descriptions of 4 common learning styles
  • Study strategies geared for your unique learner profile

To take Discover Your Learning Style, click here. You will be asked to fill out a short form, and the webinar will pop up in another window.

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Luminaria: Rise of the MOOC

by on November 19, 2013 in Luminaria with No Comments »


(To view a PDF of the print copy, click here)

IN THIS ISSUE

  • Welcome Letter from Dwight Hodgson
  • I Took A MOOC
  • Interview: MCNY President Vinton Thompson
  • Learning To Learn
  • MOOCs At MCNY?
  • Low MOOC Completion Rates
  • A Brief Tour of MOOC Providers
  • MOOCs And Math
  • LEC Students on MOOCs
MOOC cover
Welcome Letter from Dwight Hodgson

As the new Coordinator of the Learning Enhancement Center (LEC) and Mentor & Leadership Development Program (MLDP), I am excited to welcome you to another edition of Luminaria. This edition seeks to unfold the MOOC phenomenon. Recently, I have found myself thinking about my past professional experiences in non-conventional environments, which have given me an array of perspectives on education and learning. As the Education Center Coordinator for an adult basic education center, I analyzed issues ranging from the residual effects of a flawed K-12 system to the impositions of family life on the adult learner. As the Coordinator of a CUNY access program charged with getting young minorities involved in biomedical research and the world of STEM, I worked with students at the top of their undergraduate classes—students who didn’t need remedial intervention but who needed to be introduced to, and guided through, research opportunities, internships, and summer programs. And as Associate Director of Diversity and Inclusion at a premier city high school, I promoted diversity within an intelligent and articulate but, from the perch of interpersonal engagement, socially and culturally uninformed student body.

In each of these situations—and in many more like them—MOOCs have the potential to fill an education gap by giving students the time and space to step in and out of the classroom experience without interrupting their work flow. Having seen early college students selflessly offer up their naivety in exchange for an introduction to different cultures, I imagine students will bring that same innocence and yearning to the global, virtual MOOC classroom. I like to think that, in the same ways my former students strung their life experiences outside the classroom into an applicable learning device when they worked with their tutors, students enrolled in MOOCs will use their experience to enhance the experience for all. And I also believe that the communal MOOC environment will foster an opportunity for students to chime in on topics they never imagined they could have anything of substance to offer.

I am not concerned, and do not think, that MOOCs will replace the traditional classroom. More likely, they will supplement the brick-and-mortar education system richly and robustly . . . with many hiccups along the way. And that brings me full circle, to my role with the LEC and MLDP here at MCNY. As online classes and MOOCs continue to expand throughout higher education, support services—where confused and introspective students converse with real, live human tutors and mentors—will become all the more vital. As you survey the perspectives of this issue, I hope you take a moment to consider how the digital MOOC model might add to the analog nature of your education and your life. Happy reading.

CONTINUE READING →

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The Problems with Plagiarism

by on January 2, 2013 in Reflections with No Comments »


plagiari1-450x337Introduction

Plagiarism is the most serious offense in academia. Its definition—the undocumented use of another person’s work—is straightforward, and its maximum sentences for an offense are draconian: expulsion for students, termination for professors. If the stakes are so high, why would anyone risk plagiarizing another person’s work?

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Luminaria: Volume 1, Issue 9

by on November 13, 2012 in Luminaria with No Comments »


IN THIS ISSUE

  • Letter from the Editor
  • Learning the Tricks to College Life
  • Learning How to Learn: Academia’s Best Kept Secret
  • Learners Who Inherit the Future
  • Study Skills

 

Letter from the Editor

Sujey Batista, Writing Specialist

“The future belongs to those who are capable of being retrained again and again.”

—Daniel Burns

Salutations Readers,

Our latest issue discusses one of the most valuable skills one can possess as a student and working professional: the ability to learn. Lifelong learning is vital for those who seek success throughout their working lives. Those who can successfully acquire and apply this part skill, part survival tactic are more likely to thrive in today’s dynamic and fast-paced world. Lifelong learners embrace the idea of learning as a mechanism for improvement as professionals and human beings.

The submissions from our team explore this topic from a variety of angles. Aside from providing readers with a conceptual understanding of the skill, we discuss the relevance of this ability in correlation with current workforce trends and its connection to Purpose-Centered Education. The issue features an interactive piece that explores the benefits of study skills as an effective learning strategy. Another section, dedicated to the student reader, provides insight on skills that, when mastered, can ease the challenges of college life. We’ve provided our readers with valuable insight that, in combination with a self-directed attitude and open-mind, can help anyone accomplish their most valued goals. Enjoy!

Sujey

CONTINUE READING →

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Can Writing Be Taught?

by on August 7, 2012 in Must Sees with No Comments »


The title of this post poses what seems to be an impossible question. Yet it results in some very objective answers.

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How To Use a Comma

by on June 6, 2012 in Must Reads with No Comments »


The New York Times has always been good at coming up with intellectually relatable witty titles for the articles it posts to its website, and University of Delaware Professor Ben Yagoda’s recent post, “The Most Comma Mistakes,” is no exception. Now, before you do anything else, take a second look at the sentence you just read. You will notice that it is rather long (40 words) but that it contains only three commas. “How can that be?” you might wonder. “The longer a sentence is, the more commas it needs, right?” Well, that isn’t necessarily incorrect, but it’s not correct either. In fact, it’s one of those things people think is true when they don’t actually have any idea about what they’re talking about. For the truth is that if everyone took a moment to learn the basic rules of comma usage, they would find that it’s not all that difficult to master.

CONTINUE READING →

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