“First Generation Students Unite”

by on July 16, 2015 in Must Reads with No Comments »


travis regional

“Cuts in food stamps are more than just a discussion topic.” – Travis Reginal, Yale

In this article, first-generation students at Ivy colleges speak out about their challenges, in particular highlighting their common experience of disjunction in class and with other students. Their reflections prompt this writer to appreciate anew MCNY’s cohort model, as it’s possible to observe MCNY students supporting each other daily — support which seems essential for folks as the very first in their families to attend college. Laura Pappano’s (2015) article originally appeared in The New York Times.

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Multitask May Mean Multidisaster!

by on April 10, 2015 in Must Reads with No Comments »


Multitasking is bad for you (suggests data a click away).

brain-multitasking-300x300

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Diaz on Writer’s Block

by on February 27, 2015 in Must Reads with No Comments »


Calvin Writer's Block

On writing his last book, The Brief Life of Oscar Wao, Junot Diaz states, “This was a perfect storm of insecurity and madness and pressure and you name it…. Every now and then you catch one, bro, and I caught a f****** bad one.” Click below to read more from a piece published by New York Magazine.

junotFYE Read poster

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LEC Scholar Profile: Uneda Powell

by on February 24, 2015 in LEC Scholars with No Comments »


uneda

 

When I was unable to find a good paying  job with my Associate’s degree in Business Management, I decided to enroll back in school. There was a college fair at my previous college, and I met a representative from MCNY there. I picked MCNY because the classes are smaller, and the schedule is flexible —  I’m a mother of three. I was born in Jamaica and I immigrated here when I was nine. My goal is to complete my Bachelor’s degree and start my business afterwards – I would like to start a transportation company.

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from “Words Will Never Hurt Me”

by on January 30, 2015 in Must Sees with No Comments »


George Carlin

Here’s a short audio piece from Radiolab about euphemisms! Comedian George Carlin rails against descriptors that whisk away the “unpleasant” from view, while writer Adam Gopnik defends ’em.

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LEC Student Profile: Palmer Ashe

by on January 6, 2015 in Paths To MCNY with No Comments »


palmer 2

When I was a kid, my mom brought me to the Women’s Talent Corps, which was how I first got familiar with the College for Human Services. My mother was a barmaid on a 125th street at the time, and somehow she got plugged into the Women’s Talent Corps program that Audrey Cohen had started. My dad was an alcoholic who prided himself on being the first “Negro” in the NY city post office – he had a congressional award that he had over his bed that he always used to point out.  After the divorce and the domestic violence with my dad, my mom decided that she wanted to do something with herself, and wanted to be a paralegal. She was self-educated, only having a sixth grade education, but she was determined that she was somebody.

There was a lot of talk, these new terms going around, like “empowerment” – that’s what pulled folks to gravitate towards going after the American dream. What they were saying was that education was going to be the way.

I am at MCNY and it feels like a natural order of things. I got my BPS and now I am getting my MBA. My mother came through the system (MCNY) and I look up to her. She was my first role model. It was all about making my parents proud of me, because if they were proud of me, that’s what made me happy.

MCNY’s whole-system approach, the idea that there were a bunch of systems intertwined, was new for me. There was a lot of energy floating around the college. There were a lot of people who looked like me, who had the same values that I had, and some of us even shared the same culture, so I could feel comfortable here. It was a nontraditional, experiential – I didn’t know the term “hands-on” until I got here! I started college at a late age and was very fearful of starting school. There were a lot of people who were also adult learners and that helped me anchor myself here. Some of the professors I met made me feel like I could do it. I am a fearful person, and I always wonder if I can share the same space with educated people, often feeling inadequate. When I got here, there were a lot of positive people  and my negative self-talk began to disappear. I started growing, and thinking out of the box. I wasn’t so shallow, with the-I’m-black-and-you’re-white mentality. MCNY has played a role in helping me grow up. If I hadn’t come here, I’d probably still be doing barbering on 129th Street and Lenox in my small, small world.

 

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Rules Are Never Neutral — Even in Grammar

by on December 12, 2014 in Must Reads with 1 Comment »


Black and Proud

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In The Case for Black With a Capital B, Lori Thorps considers the evolution of the descriptor “Black.” In particular, she unfolds how political and cultural disenfranchisement — that is, racism — has been reflected in rules of capitalization in the US.

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What It Means To Be “Articulate”

by on October 28, 2014 in Must Sees with No Comments »


Here’s an NPR audio piece about poet and scholar Jamila Lyiscott. She explores the different meanings of being called “articulate” as an African American who speaks highly polished, academic language.

 

Jamila

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What If We Have to Fail to Succeed?

by on October 14, 2014 in Must Reads with No Comments »


Curiosity Picture

Zest

What if success isn’t about “doing it right” and is instead about one’s ability to tolerate failure? As this New York Times article “What if the Secret to Success Is Failure?” by Paul Tough details, at the prestigious private school Riverdale Country School, the headmaster champions characteristics such as grit, curiosity, and zest over specific academic skills as the true route to achievement.

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Facts and Figures

by on October 2, 2014 in Must Sees with No Comments »


Harpers

 

Some facts and figures from Harper’s Index (September, 2014) regarding education, race, national energy politics and more. A statistician’s dreamboat! Possibly profound, disturbing and hilarious for the rest of us.

 

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