Success: More Than Just Good Grades

by on June 2, 2014 in Must Reads with No Comments »


success-sketch

In the thoughtful and inspiring convocation speech George Saunders gave at Syracuse University last year, the award-winning author discusses some of his struggles to succeed and encourages graduates to consider the wider scope of success.

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What Have We Learned From 50 Years of Research on Writing?

by on May 29, 2014 in Must Sees with No Comments »


This video, from the University of California, brings together three leaders in the field of writing research and instruction, to talk about teaching and reading and writing at all levels of education.

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Public Education Reform in Newark, New Jersey

by on May 21, 2014 in Must Reads with No Comments »


newarkIn 2010, at the urging of then-Newark Mayor Cory Booker, and with the support of New Jersey Governor Chris Christie, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg pledged $100 million to reform schools in Newark, where public education is as bad as anywhere in the country. Last week, The New Yorker published a long and fascinating article examining how that money has been spent, and whether or not the problem has been solved. (Hint: Not quite.)

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LEC Student Profile: Moe Zin Win

by on May 16, 2014 in Paths To MCNY with No Comments »


100_1416[1]Last year, Moe Zin Win was a high school student at the National School of Myanmar. One day, MCNY representatives visited his school and gave a seminar about the business program. He knew he would get a good education in the U.S., so he decided to leave his family and come to New York — despite not knowing a single person here. People had told him that New York City was the  major city of America, and he was very excited, figuring there would be lots to do and he would never be bored. He was right about that, but he also thought the city would be clean and was surprised to find the transportation system as dirty as Myanmar’s! Although he misses aspects of his home — the warm weather; the Burmese food; living in a big house instead (now he shares a small apartment, in Elmhurst, Queens, with a friend from Myanmar who attends NYU) — he likes living in New York and studying at MCNY.

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Specialist Hours for Summer 2014

by on May 14, 2014 in LEC Info with No Comments »


time-clock
How to schedule a session

We find that most students choose to schedule sessions in person, either with their specialist or with our office manager, Sandra Ariza. But you can call and/or email your specialist at any time (see below for current specialist hours in Manhattan and the Bronx) or call and/or email Sandra, ext. 2438, sariza@mcny.edu.

Specialist Hours
 

MATH

WRITING

 

Barrington

(Ext 2449)

Polly

(Ext 2429)

Yasmine

(Ext 2416)

Nathan

(Ext 2418)

Monday

 

1 – 7

 

9 – 1 (BX)

2 – 6 (MH)

Tuesday  

4 – 7

1:30 – 5:30

10 – 2

11 – 7 (BX)

Wednesday


1 – 7

9 – 6:30

9 – 5 (MH)

Thursday


12:30 – 7

9 – 6:30

 9:30 – 6:30

9 – 5 (MH)

Friday


 

9 – 6:30

 9:30 – 6:30

10:30 – 2:30 (MH)

Saturday



 

10 – 2

   
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LEC Student Profile: Preston M. Radcliff, Jr.

by on May 12, 2014 in Paths To MCNY with No Comments »


Preston_Radcliff_JrWritten by Mr. Radcliff, Jr. for the LEC blog.

Living in the Now

I would be lying if I were to say I didn’t enjoy my past lifestyle of drinking and drugging and then acting a fool while under the influence.

Yes, it began as a social thing, but ended terribly as I look back.

If you were to ask me today if it was by coincidence, pure luck, or a change from within myself that had awakened me to reality, I would have told you that it was neither one of these, but God intervening.

First of all, I don’t believe in luck.

Second, coincidences come and go.

And third, the only change I counted on had to be silver coins and/or green bills in order to get that next drink and/or drug.

I wasn’t quite sure whether I was ready to take on college after I completed a treatment program. I mean, sure, I had already obtained my G.E.D. diploma, as well as, a CASAC-T, but I could not remain abstinent from my addiction.

It took 8 years, a loss of some good friends that died from drug and/or alcohol addiction and finding myself homeless, that I cried out to my Higher Power, whom I choose to call God, for forgiveness and a way out of living prodigal.

I didn’t know Human Services, the course I chose, would involve so much, but through rigorous studying, and with the help of my class instructors, my classmates and the resources the college offers, I can say I did kind of good in Purpose One.

As I made mention earlier about luck, coincidences and how neither one of these words had any effect on my life, I do thank God for giving me the opportunity for the chance of making a life for myself.

I’ve come to the realization that the world never promises you a rose garden, for you have to put in the work, and as my father once told me, and I quote, “Nothing comes to a dreamer, but a dream,” unquote.

Now, I don’t know just how far I’ll be going in college, but I do want to at least obtain my Associate’s degree in Human Services. As I mentioned earlier, expecting the unexpected is what keeps me focused.

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Racism on College Campuses: A More Subtle Look?

by on April 8, 2014 in Must Reads with No Comments »


raceThis NYT article, “Students See Many Slights as Racial ‘Microagressions’,” explores a trend in discussions at US colleges about racism. Social workers have been talking about microagressions for years and anyone who has experienced racism already knows exactly what a microagression is: a communication that occurs on the subtle level of gesture, tone, or implication.  Students have begun pointing to this micro-level of action rather than overt and direct demeaning statements, opening up conversations about what constitutes racism. Of course, this has stoked some controversy, as this article seems eager to note. Strikes me that the author has some doubt and to be fair, determining someone else’s “true intention” can be a tricky affair. But to deny the existence of this form of aggression strikes this reader as possibly more dangerous.

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Marvelous, Torturous Marshmallows

by on April 1, 2014 in Must Sees with No Comments »


Mischel’s well-known study invited children to refuse a marshmallow with the prospect that successful resisting would mean two marshmallows later! The results lead us to consider – somewhat controversially – the nature of willpower. Is it learned? Is it innate? A mix? Can we make a prediction about a person’s life outcomes based on how they interact with a marshmallow at age four? This Radiolab audio podcast explores here.

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LEC Student Profile: Darryl Carr

by on March 13, 2014 in Paths To MCNY with No Comments »


photo

In 2007, Darryl was in a coma for five days after a terrible car accident. He had multiple surgeries on his mouth because every tooth was shattered. He was embarrassed because he felt as if he’d lost his smile. He would cover his face when he talked, afraid that he’d be judged when people saw that he didn’t have any teeth. At the time he hated commercials that showed people smiling. Eventually he learned to cope with these challenges, and he’s not ashamed anymore. He enrolled at TCI in 2012 and received an Associate Degree in Human Services in 2013. That year, he was dealt another severe blow; this time it was Hurricane Sandy. He was living in Staten Island, and he woke up to five feet of water in his house and one wall completely gone. He felt very alone, and he didn’t know what to do. He was placed in temporary housing tents. He continued to attend school, but it was difficult because he didn’t have the resources that most students had (computer, iPad, Kindle, etc.). During this time, he resisted asking for help. He went out of his way to help others, but when it came to asking for help for himself, he didn’t know how. He currently attends MCNY for a Bachelor Degree in Professional Studies. He was recently informed that he’s eligible for Phi Theta. He sees this not only as an incredible honor, but also as a “light at the end of the tunnel.” He has an internship at Housing Works, and he loves it. He’s experienced the staff at MCNY to be very passionate in their work to help students achieve their goals, and he appreciates their support very much. After being at MCNY for a little while, he now knows people care; this has motivated him to apply for the master’s degree program.

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LEC Student Profile: Saroja Sherpa

by on February 27, 2014 in Paths To MCNY with No Comments »


100_1412Purpose 1 Business student Saroja Sherpa is originally from Nepal, where she lived for 24 years. While working for CARE International and the Peace Corps, where she was a junior secretary, she learned about the progressive ideas and values of American culture. In particular, she was affected by the idea that women should have no shame in being able to work in society. Eventually, her husband came to the United States, where they thought their son would get a good education. She followed the family soon thereafter, moving to New York City and babysitting (she loves children and even had another son, who is now a teenager). As a babysitter, Saroja began to build her fluency in English by reading children’s books with kids. But, for about a decade, she suffered from a lack of confidence, as she saw how much Americans studied. Ultimately, she decided to get a GED, after which she went to an adult learning center in Brooklyn. The first day there, her teacher, who was 84 years old, gave the class Chinua Achebe’s book “Things Fall Apart.” Saroja read it faster than all her classmates, and enjoyed doing so (she loves reading), which convinced her she was finally ready for college. She enrolled in the Professional Business College, did well, finished quickly, and discovered that all of her credits transferred to MCNY. So here she is!

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