How to Achieve Your Goals

by on July 1, 2014 in Must Sees with No Comments »


In his dynamic and humorous Ted Talk, former Denver Broncos running back Reggie Rivers discusses how to achieve goals through focusing on behaviors that are within our control. It provides some interesting food for thought when considered in the context of the Purpose-Centered Education model of MCNY and the LEC’s goal of setting the groundwork for you to take charge of your education!

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LEC Student Profile: Krystal Melendez

by on June 23, 2014 in Paths To MCNY with No Comments »


Krystal MelendezI was raised in Coney Island, Brooklyn, along with my three sisters and brother. I witnessed issues such as addiction, domestic violence, and gun violence damage many of the families around me. During those years, I was also lumped into stereotypical assumptions of character based on my ethnicity and what neighborhood I called home. The discrimination that I experienced and my environment are reasons I am enrolled in MCNY’s Human Services degree program today. My first attempt at college was in 2004. The transition from Leon M. Goldstein high school to John Jay College was not easy. I was 17 years old, fresh out of high-school, and full of anxiety. Reasons for dropping out of John Jay were: 1. Confusion, 2. Enrollment in courses I was not interested in and 3. The inability to juggle the demands of work, school, family and my social life. Subsequently, I spent my time quitting every job that hired me because there were no opportunities for growth. I also completed training programs along the way, which I felt would broaden my horizons. Although I did well, I exited each program with an overall sense of unpreparedness and lack of sufficient work experience. I decided to return to college because a degree is necessary for me to achieve the level of success I desire. My first college experience was a culture shock. I felt like I was doggy paddling my way through my classes, barely able to keep my head above the water. The second time around, factors that have contributed to my success at MCNY are: accepting feedback, having clear goals, utilizing available resources, and learning how to manage my time. In addition, the faculty continuously challenges me to raise the bar of my own expectations. I have learned not to be ashamed to ask for help, to take charge of my learning; revisiting the basics often is necessary, and achieving a balance is difficult but possible.

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Need a Break from Your Studies and Your Cares of the World? Two Minutes May Be Enough.

by on June 17, 2014 in Must Sees with No Comments »


Click on the picture below for two minutes of glorious — and perhaps challenging — nothing. It might show you some things about yourself — at least, I had no idea how hard it was to settle my frisky fingers (and brain). Upon my return to the world, I felt much more ready to engage. Courtesy of Jaya Kanan, previous Coordinator of the LEC.

 

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LEC Alumni Profile: Elie Jerome, MPA

by on June 12, 2014 in Paths To MCNY with No Comments »


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Following the devastating earthquake in Haiti on January 12, 2010, I was selected with five other Haitian students to come to New York and study Emergency and Disaster Management at MCNY to help Haiti for future disasters. I was very excited because it was one of my dreams to study in the U.S. But when I took a seat in class, I could barely understand what was said because the way I used to pronounce words was completely different from the way there are pronounced in the United States.

 

During that first week, I submitted my first assignment for my writing class to my writing professor. She gave me back the paper and said that she was not able to grade because she did not understand it. At that moment, I felt I was going straight toward failure in that Master’s program. I could read in the professors’ eyes that we were a casting mistake.

 

During our welcoming ceremony at Borough Hall, I made a speech that made everyone clap their hands. At that moment, I realized my chance to succeed in the program was not over, but I was at the beginning of a challenging journey. I knew my failure would have been a failure for my country and giving up was not an option. It was one of the greatest challenges of my life. Therefore, I decided to read more, take ESL classes, make the MCNY library my new home, and go to the LEC to improve my writing. At the end of the semester, I had an A for my writing class. And now, I just finished my first novel: I Dare You To Try It, that will be published soon. Thanks to LEC.

 

I was shy because of my accent, but Prof. Motola advised me to speak up. So I became more confident in my presentations. Some professors especially Prof. Chuck Frank and Prof. Mick Maurer, challenged us regardless of our origin, which built our capabilities. The college also organized a trip to Chile where we gained more knowledge and skills in disasters. I was very proud of my 3.83 total GPA.

 

What really makes MCNY special is the way the staff empower students with knowledge, skills, and self-confidence. A special thanks to God, my family, the Council Member, Matthieu Eugene, and MCNY. It was a wonderful experience for me at MCNY. The MCNY staff (admission, financial aid, registrar, LEC, etc…), my classmates, and my professors were amazing.

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LEC Student Profile: Clarita Liepolt

by on June 10, 2014 in Paths To MCNY with No Comments »


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Clarita was born in Pereira, Colombia. She lived there into her adult years, and earned a masters degree there in Educational Administration. Throughout her years of eclectic professional experience in Colombia and here in the United States, she has worked as a teacher, a public health educator, a city government interpreter, and a chauffeur! Her sculpture has been commissioned by various institutions, and she has been awarded various recognition for her other art work. She came to MCNY with a desire to further develop her professional skills and contribute to the fascinating field of emergency and disaster management. As English is her second language, she still struggles a bit with pronunciation, but she does not let that impede her from engaging enthusiastically with her studies and following her curiosities with tireless passion. She practices her pronunciation by repeating new words aloud until they become more familiar. Though challenging and frustrating at times, this practice is important to her because she wants to ensure that her speaking ability matches her level of intelligence – it’s important to her, as it is to everyone, to be understood! She loves New York City and is passionate about being involved in the city’s emergency and disaster management in meaningful ways that make a difference.

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The Benefits of Handwriting

by on June 6, 2014 in Must Reads with No Comments »


handwritingDid you ever wonder what will happen if (/when) no one writes by hand anymore? As explained in this article, psychologists and neuroscientists have found new evidence that suggests deep links between handwriting and broader educational development.

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Success: More Than Just Good Grades

by on June 2, 2014 in Must Reads with No Comments »


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In the thoughtful and inspiring convocation speech George Saunders gave at Syracuse University last year, the award-winning author discusses some of his struggles to succeed and encourages graduates to consider the wider scope of success.

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What Have We Learned From 50 Years of Research on Writing?

by on May 29, 2014 in Must Sees with No Comments »


This video, from the University of California, brings together three leaders in the field of writing research and instruction, to talk about teaching and reading and writing at all levels of education.

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Public Education Reform in Newark, New Jersey

by on May 21, 2014 in Must Reads with No Comments »


newarkIn 2010, at the urging of then-Newark Mayor Cory Booker, and with the support of New Jersey Governor Chris Christie, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg pledged $100 million to reform schools in Newark, where public education is as bad as anywhere in the country. Last week, The New Yorker published a long and fascinating article examining how that money has been spent, and whether or not the problem has been solved. (Hint: Not quite.)

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LEC Student Profile: Moe Zin Win

by on May 16, 2014 in Paths To MCNY with No Comments »


100_1416[1]Last year, Moe Zin Win was a high school student at the National School of Myanmar. One day, MCNY representatives visited his school and gave a seminar about the business program. He knew he would get a good education in the U.S., so he decided to leave his family and come to New York — despite not knowing a single person here. People had told him that New York City was the  major city of America, and he was very excited, figuring there would be lots to do and he would never be bored. He was right about that, but he also thought the city would be clean and was surprised to find the transportation system as dirty as Myanmar’s! Although he misses aspects of his home — the warm weather; the Burmese food; living in a big house instead (now he shares a small apartment, in Elmhurst, Queens, with a friend from Myanmar who attends NYU) — he likes living in New York and studying at MCNY.

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