Need a Break from Your Studies and Your Cares of the World? Two Minutes May Be Enough.

by on June 17, 2014 in Must Sees with No Comments »


Click on the picture below for two minutes of glorious — and perhaps challenging — nothing. It might show you some things about yourself — at least, I had no idea how hard it was to settle my frisky fingers (and brain). Upon my return to the world, I felt much more ready to engage. Courtesy of Jaya Kanan, previous Coordinator of the LEC.

 

Do_Nothing

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LEC Alumni Profile: Elie Jerome, MPA

by on June 12, 2014 in Paths To MCNY with No Comments »


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Following the devastating earthquake in Haiti on January 12, 2010, I was selected with five other Haitian students to come to New York and study Emergency and Disaster Management at MCNY to help Haiti for future disasters. I was very excited because it was one of my dreams to study in the U.S. But when I took a seat in class, I could barely understand what was said because the way I used to pronounce words was completely different from the way there are pronounced in the United States.

 

During that first week, I submitted my first assignment for my writing class to my writing professor. She gave me back the paper and said that she was not able to grade because she did not understand it. At that moment, I felt I was going straight toward failure in that Master’s program. I could read in the professors’ eyes that we were a casting mistake.

 

During our welcoming ceremony at Borough Hall, I made a speech that made everyone clap their hands. At that moment, I realized my chance to succeed in the program was not over, but I was at the beginning of a challenging journey. I knew my failure would have been a failure for my country and giving up was not an option. It was one of the greatest challenges of my life. Therefore, I decided to read more, take ESL classes, make the MCNY library my new home, and go to the LEC to improve my writing. At the end of the semester, I had an A for my writing class. And now, I just finished my first novel: I Dare You To Try It, that will be published soon. Thanks to LEC.

 

I was shy because of my accent, but Prof. Motola advised me to speak up. So I became more confident in my presentations. Some professors especially Prof. Chuck Frank and Prof. Mick Maurer, challenged us regardless of our origin, which built our capabilities. The college also organized a trip to Chile where we gained more knowledge and skills in disasters. I was very proud of my 3.83 total GPA.

 

What really makes MCNY special is the way the staff empower students with knowledge, skills, and self-confidence. A special thanks to God, my family, the Council Member, Matthieu Eugene, and MCNY. It was a wonderful experience for me at MCNY. The MCNY staff (admission, financial aid, registrar, LEC, etc…), my classmates, and my professors were amazing.

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LEC Student Profile: Clarita Liepolt

by on June 10, 2014 in Paths To MCNY with No Comments »


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Clarita was born in Pereira, Colombia. She lived there into her adult years, and earned a masters degree there in Educational Administration. Throughout her years of eclectic professional experience in Colombia and here in the United States, she has worked as a teacher, a public health educator, a city government interpreter, and a chauffeur! Her sculpture has been commissioned by various institutions, and she has been awarded various recognition for her other art work. She came to MCNY with a desire to further develop her professional skills and contribute to the fascinating field of emergency and disaster management. As English is her second language, she still struggles a bit with pronunciation, but she does not let that impede her from engaging enthusiastically with her studies and following her curiosities with tireless passion. She practices her pronunciation by repeating new words aloud until they become more familiar. Though challenging and frustrating at times, this practice is important to her because she wants to ensure that her speaking ability matches her level of intelligence – it’s important to her, as it is to everyone, to be understood! She loves New York City and is passionate about being involved in the city’s emergency and disaster management in meaningful ways that make a difference.

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The Benefits of Handwriting

by on June 6, 2014 in Must Reads with No Comments »


handwritingDid you ever wonder what will happen if (/when) no one writes by hand anymore? As explained in this article, psychologists and neuroscientists have found new evidence that suggests deep links between handwriting and broader educational development.

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Success: More Than Just Good Grades

by on June 2, 2014 in Must Reads with No Comments »


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In the thoughtful and inspiring convocation speech George Saunders gave at Syracuse University last year, the award-winning author discusses some of his struggles to succeed and encourages graduates to consider the wider scope of success.

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What Have We Learned From 50 Years of Research on Writing?

by on May 29, 2014 in Must Sees with No Comments »


This video, from the University of California, brings together three leaders in the field of writing research and instruction, to talk about teaching and reading and writing at all levels of education.

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Public Education Reform in Newark, New Jersey

by on May 21, 2014 in Must Reads with No Comments »


newarkIn 2010, at the urging of then-Newark Mayor Cory Booker, and with the support of New Jersey Governor Chris Christie, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg pledged $100 million to reform schools in Newark, where public education is as bad as anywhere in the country. Last week, The New Yorker published a long and fascinating article examining how that money has been spent, and whether or not the problem has been solved. (Hint: Not quite.)

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LEC Student Profile: Moe Zin Win

by on May 16, 2014 in Paths To MCNY with No Comments »


100_1416[1]Last year, Moe Zin Win was a high school student at the National School of Myanmar. One day, MCNY representatives visited his school and gave a seminar about the business program. He knew he would get a good education in the U.S., so he decided to leave his family and come to New York — despite not knowing a single person here. People had told him that New York City was the  major city of America, and he was very excited, figuring there would be lots to do and he would never be bored. He was right about that, but he also thought the city would be clean and was surprised to find the transportation system as dirty as Myanmar’s! Although he misses aspects of his home — the warm weather; the Burmese food; living in a big house instead (now he shares a small apartment, in Elmhurst, Queens, with a friend from Myanmar who attends NYU) — he likes living in New York and studying at MCNY.

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Specialist Hours for Summer 2014

by on May 14, 2014 in LEC Info with No Comments »


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How to schedule a session

We find that most students choose to schedule sessions in person, either with their specialist or with our office manager, Sandra Ariza. But you can call and/or email your specialist at any time (see below for current specialist hours in Manhattan and the Bronx) or call and/or email Sandra, ext. 2438, sariza@mcny.edu.

Specialist Hours
 

MATH

WRITING

 

Barrington

(Ext 2449)

Polly

(Ext 2429)

Yasmine

(Ext 2416)

Nathan

(Ext 2418)

Monday

 

1 – 7

 

9 – 1 (BX)

2 – 6 (MH)

Tuesday  

4 – 7

1:30 – 5:30

10 – 2

11 – 7 (BX)

Wednesday


1 – 7

9 – 6:30

9 – 5 (MH)

Thursday


12:30 – 7

9 – 6:30

 9:30 – 6:30

9 – 5 (MH)

Friday


 

9 – 6:30

 9:30 – 6:30

10:30 – 2:30 (MH)

Saturday



 

10 – 2

   
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LEC Student Profile: Preston M. Radcliff, Jr.

by on May 12, 2014 in Paths To MCNY with No Comments »


Preston_Radcliff_JrWritten by Mr. Radcliff, Jr. for the LEC blog.

Living in the Now

I would be lying if I were to say I didn’t enjoy my past lifestyle of drinking and drugging and then acting a fool while under the influence.

Yes, it began as a social thing, but ended terribly as I look back.

If you were to ask me today if it was by coincidence, pure luck, or a change from within myself that had awakened me to reality, I would have told you that it was neither one of these, but God intervening.

First of all, I don’t believe in luck.

Second, coincidences come and go.

And third, the only change I counted on had to be silver coins and/or green bills in order to get that next drink and/or drug.

I wasn’t quite sure whether I was ready to take on college after I completed a treatment program. I mean, sure, I had already obtained my G.E.D. diploma, as well as, a CASAC-T, but I could not remain abstinent from my addiction.

It took 8 years, a loss of some good friends that died from drug and/or alcohol addiction and finding myself homeless, that I cried out to my Higher Power, whom I choose to call God, for forgiveness and a way out of living prodigal.

I didn’t know Human Services, the course I chose, would involve so much, but through rigorous studying, and with the help of my class instructors, my classmates and the resources the college offers, I can say I did kind of good in Purpose One.

As I made mention earlier about luck, coincidences and how neither one of these words had any effect on my life, I do thank God for giving me the opportunity for the chance of making a life for myself.

I’ve come to the realization that the world never promises you a rose garden, for you have to put in the work, and as my father once told me, and I quote, “Nothing comes to a dreamer, but a dream,” unquote.

Now, I don’t know just how far I’ll be going in college, but I do want to at least obtain my Associate’s degree in Human Services. As I mentioned earlier, expecting the unexpected is what keeps me focused.

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