Luminaria: Rise of the MOOC

by on November 19, 2013 in Luminaria with No Comments »


(To view a PDF of the print copy, click here)

IN THIS ISSUE

  • Welcome Letter from Dwight Hodgson
  • I Took A MOOC
  • Interview: MCNY President Vinton Thompson
  • Learning To Learn
  • MOOCs At MCNY?
  • Low MOOC Completion Rates
  • A Brief Tour of MOOC Providers
  • MOOCs And Math
  • LEC Students on MOOCs
MOOC cover
Welcome Letter from Dwight Hodgson

As the new Coordinator of the Learning Enhancement Center (LEC) and Mentor & Leadership Development Program (MLDP), I am excited to welcome you to another edition of Luminaria. This edition seeks to unfold the MOOC phenomenon. Recently, I have found myself thinking about my past professional experiences in non-conventional environments, which have given me an array of perspectives on education and learning. As the Education Center Coordinator for an adult basic education center, I analyzed issues ranging from the residual effects of a flawed K-12 system to the impositions of family life on the adult learner. As the Coordinator of a CUNY access program charged with getting young minorities involved in biomedical research and the world of STEM, I worked with students at the top of their undergraduate classes—students who didn’t need remedial intervention but who needed to be introduced to, and guided through, research opportunities, internships, and summer programs. And as Associate Director of Diversity and Inclusion at a premier city high school, I promoted diversity within an intelligent and articulate but, from the perch of interpersonal engagement, socially and culturally uninformed student body.

In each of these situations—and in many more like them—MOOCs have the potential to fill an education gap by giving students the time and space to step in and out of the classroom experience without interrupting their work flow. Having seen early college students selflessly offer up their naivety in exchange for an introduction to different cultures, I imagine students will bring that same innocence and yearning to the global, virtual MOOC classroom. I like to think that, in the same ways my former students strung their life experiences outside the classroom into an applicable learning device when they worked with their tutors, students enrolled in MOOCs will use their experience to enhance the experience for all. And I also believe that the communal MOOC environment will foster an opportunity for students to chime in on topics they never imagined they could have anything of substance to offer.

I am not concerned, and do not think, that MOOCs will replace the traditional classroom. More likely, they will supplement the brick-and-mortar education system richly and robustly . . . with many hiccups along the way. And that brings me full circle, to my role with the LEC and MLDP here at MCNY. As online classes and MOOCs continue to expand throughout higher education, support services—where confused and introspective students converse with real, live human tutors and mentors—will become all the more vital. As you survey the perspectives of this issue, I hope you take a moment to consider how the digital MOOC model might add to the analog nature of your education and your life. Happy reading.

CONTINUE READING →

Share

Be Your Own Superhero: Grade-Saving Strategies

by on July 12, 2012 in Reflections with No Comments »


Students often find themselves on the verge of flunking a class, and having already lost the option to withdraw, the realization of the situation  produces a panic that becomes debilitating.  As a result, some students succumb to the frenzy and allow the rest of their semester to crash and burn.

Instead, “Keep calm and carry on”, as states the recently commercialized British government slogan.  Don’t wave the white flag and don’t call off the troops. There’s still time to save your grade!

The following grade-saving strategies will help you make the most of the remaining semester:

1. Reach out to professors

Communicating with professors is an excellent grade-saving strategy. It’s never too late to speak to the instructor. Express your desire to improve your current standing and find out exactly what is expected of you.   Professors are usually willing to work something out if you show that you’re serious and motivated.  You can haggle for some extra credit, extensions on deadlines, and resubmissions for higher marks.

CONTINUE READING →

Share

Luminaria: Volume 1, Issue 8

by on October 13, 2011 in Luminaria with 2 Comments »


IN THIS ISSUE

  • Letter from the Editor
  • Q&A: Self-Directed Learning
  • Short Story: “Zombies of the Big Apple”
  • Special Feature: A Film on Self-Directed Learning
  • Math Corner
  • A Concluding Note

 

The Editor Speaks

Letter from Nathan Schiller, Writing Specialist, LEC

Dear Readers,

The theme for this issue of Luminaria, the LEC newsletter, is the guiding concept of the LEC: self-directed learning. This may seem like an obvious term—Q: What is self-directed learning? A: It’s when you learn by directing yourself!—but it is actually much more layered, complex, and interesting. And because it is an idea crucial to MCNY, it is, therefore, an idea worth exploring.

CONTINUE READING →

Share

Categories

Tags

advice brain teasers College college decisions communication confidence education ESL failure fraction myth free information goals grammar inspiration knowledge learning learning strategies lifelong learning Luminaria math math reflections MCNY newsletter new york times parker pracjek plagiarism prewriting profiles reading rewriting self-directed learning siblings specialist hours stanley fish student student debt students study skills success sucess teaching the internet the new yorker time management writing

Copyright © 2014, | The Specialist is proudly powered by WordPress All rights Reserved | Theme by Ryan McNair